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GETTING ADJUSTED TO YOUR DENTURES

Getting used to new dentures is like anything else it takes time. If you look at the adjustment period as a journey, you’ll remember that there’s also a destination. Even the most experienced denture wearers have a few challenges.  

 

Adjusting to dentures takes about thirty days. Here’s what you can expect.

Getting used to new dentures is like anything else it takes time. If you look at the adjustment period as a journey, you’ll remember that there’s also a destination. Even the most experienced denture wearers have a few challenges.  

 

Here's what you can expect in the initial adjustment period:

 

Gum Irritation:

Gum irritation and sore spots from your dentures are not unusual. This is caused by the movement of the dentures as the mouth heals, and the patient learns to use them. If you’ve had teeth extracted or are received upper and lower dentures, expect a longer healing time. Rinsing your mouth regularly with warm salt water is helpful.  

If you aren’t seeing any sign of healing particularly if a sore persists and is painful, stop wearing your denture and visit your denturist. You may need a minor adjustment.

 

Eating:

During the first few weeks of receiving new dentures limit yourself to soft foods such as soups, eggs, and jello. (Time to bring out those cookbooks, or perhaps your denturist will provide you with a list of recommended foods.) But this is only temporary. As your mouth heals and you become more comfortable with your dentures, you’ll be able to get back to eating all your normal foods. In fact, we recommend a celebration dinner of all your favourite foods at the end of 30 days. 

 

Speaking:

This can be another hurdle and is overcome with patience and practise. You’ll notice an improvement with speech patterns when you’re mouth starts to heal and you’ve become accustomed to the new dentures.

 

But practice, practice, practice. It really does make you perfect. Watch yourself in a mirror and say the sounds that give you trouble such as the ‘s’ or ‘th’. Try repeating ‘66’ and ‘67’ to attack the really difficult sounds. Practice with your plants, after all you have to water them anyway.  

 

Increase in Saliva:

Some patients experience an increase in saliva. That’s the mouth doing its job and reacting to the presence of something new in your mouth. Don’t worry, soon your salivary glands will adjust and resume normal production. Try swallowing more often, or rinsing your mouth out if there is an unpleasant taste.

 

Gagging sensation:

Gagging is a normal reaction and gradually disappears as you wear your dentures. The experience stems from feeling that the upper denture is too long but it’s not. The exact length of the denture is determined by your mouth and is created to the exact length to ensure the seal or suction. Don’t ignore gagging, try to work through it. And if it continues, it’s best to bring it to the attention of your denturist.

 

And lastly, look forward to enjoying your new life with a brand new smile.